Category

How to get better at wordplay in rap

We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audiences come from. To learn more or opt-out, read our Cookie Policy. The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of any other agency, organization, employer or company. In hip-hop, the greatest rappers to have ever touched a mic and spit their truth have dabbled in this art. Some have done it more smoothly than others, who—in their own right—have made the obvious a bit more clear. Wordplay can come about in a multitude of directions, but the overall goal is to execute a pun or pop culture reference through word alterations and the flipping of meanings. A few methods include: internal rhyme schemes; varying pronunciations; synonyms; synonyms juxtaposed by antonyms; syllable breakdowns; double, triple, and even quadruple entendres; and spelling. To be clear, this article is not attempting to throw its two cents in the debate of who the best wordplay-ist is, but rather go lyric by lyric on some of the top-notch, heavy-hitter examples hip-hop has ever delivered to the culture. An easy one with the answer right in the lyric! The slickest to ever do it, Slick Rick recalls meeting this tempting beauty, named after the painting, at a pizza parlor.
young prostituteanalsex ltinas onley free videos
black teen forced to suck
european women nude pics

Many writers use wordplay to entertain an audience, hip hop artists who use it well become legends. All rappers need to learn how to effectively use wordplay, because many styles of rap rely on wordplay to sway a crowd in their direction. Battle rappers who make references to their opponents using wordplay always get a reaction from the crowd.
lexi love anal
taimie hannum teen video
nude skinny tattooed girl
mariah kary getting fucked pornbrazzers black lesbiantsunade hot porn

The Best True Posse Cuts In Rap

I hold my own like. Appendix I — Idioms. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Notify me of new posts via email. Skip to content. Home About.
chloe grace moretz xxxsmall teen fucking nudefirst hard anal porn

How To Use Wordplay In A Rap

I have learned this painfully with my child growing up in the LDS community. On top of his work schedule, there are other demands on his time like his family and friends. You guys are looking into this wayyyyyyy too much. The ones who already had concerns start questioning. I would not fear as much as she does, but that is her reality. I think my husband would do okay with the loneliness - just like I do. I love him so much, but it's torture spending so much time without him. Which even the kind ones are. If you have a literal belief that you need to have a temple marriage to go to the celestial kingdom, you will always keep a secret desire to convert your spouse. So good to find this I am married to a Dr with 2 young kids.
halloween sexy babes nudehot indian amateur anal teen videofree sexy womans porn comic

Many writers use wordplay to entertain an audience, hip hop artists who use it well become legends. All rappers need to learn how to effectively use wordplay, because many styles of rap rely on wordplay to sway a crowd in their direction. Battle rappers who make references to their opponents using wordplay always get a reaction from the crowd. Comedic rappers use humorous wordplay to make you laugh. Street rappers use wordplay and street themes to entertain. A posse cut is a cypher on wax. Cypher: a DJ puts on a beat and several rappers take turns rapping over it.

Posse cuts that will be released as singles all have hooks. And most of those types of posse cuts are the best place to find wordplay on wax. Posse cuts started as a showcase for a whole group to rap together and show the group united. So posse cuts were born out of necessity.

A way to use wordplay and idioms at the same time. The great thing about The Native Tongues Movement A Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, Jungle Brothers and others is that they kept the tropes that made hip hop what it is and rejected what they believed to be passe, like negativity and violence, and championed individuality.

They just have to be different. The Tribe got together with the Leaders of The New School to make one of the greatest rap songs ever. But no list of posse cuts would be complete without this song. The dark menacing beat by Buckwild is a great example of archetypal boom bap most often found on great posse cuts.

An all-star cast of The L. Best wordplay: Sauce Money is too underrated. He is a prime example of a wordplay driven street rapper. This song is famous for being the debut of the boriqua bomber, Big Pun. But there are a few interesting uses of wordplay. AZ, Cormega, Nas and Foxy over smooth strings that sound like a gangster movie soundtrack. The Firm uses mafia themes more than wordplay. A different way of approaching a posse cut, using the mafia form of street themes.

The wordplay on this song is fantastic, pun intended. Especially Cam, Jada and Fabolous. Too many examples to include in a caption. Danny Brown has a decent following, but still more people need to know about him. He is at least as good as J. I just love this song! The most star-packed posse cut of all-time. Sway, King Tech and DJ Revolution have always been doing it for the culture and this track proves it. Every rule is made to be broken. There are a few posse cuts with hooks meant to be released as singles that were for the culture.

The best of those hits is Flava In Ya Ear. This is the most important post I have ever made. If there is a single technique missing in new music that is leading to the decline in hip hop, it is the decrease in proper wordplay. The best place to start in learning wordplay is explaining exactly what it is. Wordplay is using the multiple meanings, spelling and structure of words and sentences to surprise a listener and create humor. Shakespeare used wordplay. A pun is wordplay. It plays on a double meaning of a word to make a joke.

Wordplay techniques like these are the most effective way to sway any crowd. The right hook to knock out any contender. If it lands you win. Using puns in a rap requires finesse. Bad puns are what makes a line cringe worthy. The only way to know is to write puns yourself, trial and error. A pun relies on the double meaning of a single word within a sentence. The key to writing puns is finding words that sound the same but have different meanings or spellings.

Start with a list of homophones. Google it. Then use the list to write as many lines in a row as you can. Choose two words with the same pronunciation but different meanings and make a rhyme with it. Two parts two a bar. Subject and predicate. Set-up and payoff. The first half of the bar is the subject. What the bar is about. The subject usually contains the set-up. The set-up is the first part of the joke that creates an expectation, which is then subverted by the payoff.

It sets us up for a phrase that relates to having soul. It becomes a pun when he subverts our expectations by comparing it to shoe soles. This is the best way to structure any rhyme, not just puns and wordplay. The easiest way to practice writing wordplay is to use a list of homophones to write a bar and think of alternative meanings as a rhyme.

A decent rhyme off the top of my head. I need to practice more. Then fill in the context after. Rinse and repeat. As you get better, you can advance the structure and complexity. The skillful bending of the meaning of a brand-name or pop culture reference will always get a reaction from the audience. Especially when paired with a multi-syllable rhyme like Kanye does in the above example. Most wordplay depends on references and many rappers become known for their colorful use of the technique. Try to use them as much as possible in your wordplay.

It is considered a generally sloppy practice when you rhyme the same word with itself. It is only acceptable when the meanings of the two words in question are different, but sound the same. He twists unorthodox phrases to make them sound the same. What makes Killa so adept at this technique is the fact that he is unpredictable with the way he uses it.

Because Cam himself is dope. This is another technique where you can use commonly used phrases to your advantage. Look up lists of idioms and cliches on Google, we will be using the lists to create more rhymes. A great way to use wordplay. It requires creativity to make certain phrases make sense in a wordplay context. It may take an unorthodox comparison. It may take a slant rhyme. Or you may have to change the way you say a word to make it fit. Luckily, these things only make your wordplay sound better.

Random idiom: Red carpet treatment. Using your idiom as the rhyme is the easiest way to begin practicing wordplay. As you get better the subject matter will evolve though. Do what comes easiest to you in the beginning. The path of least resistance.

There are other ways to use wordplay by manipulating the structure and spelling of your lyrics. This is the way the earliest rappers played with words to add more creativity to their lyrics. Spell your name, especially if it has a strange spelling. The technique here is taking parts of a word or phrase and mixing them up. They call this a spoonerism. Otherwise this technique can come across a little campy.



118 :: 119 :: 120 :: 121 :: 122 :: 123 :: 124
Comments
  • Merg8 days agoI am assured. Write to me in PM, we will communicate.Follow REVOLT online: In my opinion you are not right.
Comments
  • Kazibar10 days agoTell to me, please - where I can find more information on this question?
Comments
  • Tagar18 days agoChoice at you hardAbout don't sweat the technique