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Images of middle school cirls but cracks

Popular media have played a crucial role in the construction, representation, reproduction, and transmission of stereotypes of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics STEM professionals, yet little is known about how these stereotypes influence STEM identity formation. Media images of STEM professionals may be important sources of information about STEM and may be particularly salient and relevant for girls during adolescence as they actively consider future personal and professional identities. This article describes gender-stereotyped media images of STEM professionals and examines theories to identify variables that explain the potential influence of these images on STEM identity formation. Media images of STEM science, technology, engineering, and mathematics professionals have varied over the years — from mad scientists to absent-minded professors to brilliant geniuses to maniacal villains to socially awkward loners to life-saving heroes. Many of these images of scientists, technologists, engineers, and mathematicians, however, have presented what has been described as a public image problem for STEM Congressional Commission on the Advancement of Women and Minorities in Science Engineering and Technology Development , Media images of STEM professionals not only have been unflattering and unfavorable but also often have been gender stereotyped. When asked to draw or describe STEM professionals, adolescents most often depict STEM professionals as male — as well as white, middle-aged or elderly, unattractive, dressed in a lab coat and glasses, geeky or nerdy, socially awkward, and individuals who work alone Mead and Metraux, ; Fort and Varney, ; Maoldomhnaigh and Mhaolain, ; Huber and Burton, ; She, ; Barman, , ; Parsons, ; Song and Kim, ; Knight and Cunningham, ; Mercier et al. However, when adolescent girls view STEM fields as masculine, their perceptions can negatively affect their identification, interest, and participation in STEM Lips, ; Packard and Wong, ; Steinke, , ; Cheryan et al. Studies focused on broadening participation in STEM have considered a variety of approaches and strategies and have identified many factors found to play a role in the underrepresentation of women in STEM see, for example, Clewell and Campbell, ; Rosser, Determining the most effective strategies and best practices for recruiting and retaining women in low participation STEM fields like engineering and computer science remains a complex challenge American Association of University Women,
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Common Sense says

It was my first middle school dance, and, as an eighth grader, this was a pretty big deal. I had waited my entire middle school career to be allowed to attend a school dance my parents had rules. And you guys, I was having the best time. Suddenly, everyone was pairing off to sway to the music in that awkward, middle-school-slow-dance kind of way. Everyone, that is, except me. Chicago Bulls clothing or colors to be exact. That is why, according to a girl who saw me standing solo on the wall during slow dance after slow dance that night, nobody wanted to dance with me. Thanks to this classic middle-school mean girl, my eyes were opened up for the first time that the way I looked was something I needed to think about negatively. What is Body Image? While it may not happen just like it did for me, the reality is that body image is something that most middle schoolers are becoming aware of and beginning to struggle with.
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Parents say

We use cookies and other technologies to analyze site traffic, understand patterns of use, and improve your browsing experience. See our cookie policy. Skip to Content. See what's streaming, limit strong violence or language, and find picks your kids will love with Common Sense Media Plus. Readers will learn something about codes, such as the Fibonacci code and Caeser shifts. They may be inspired to learn more or try some codes of their own. Farrah learns to be her true brainy self -- and show that self to John. Once she cracks a eco-terrorist group's code, she's committed to using her skills to fight them and thwart a major attack. Farrah is a strong, smart girl, and she gets a lot of loving support from her parents and even her younger brother, who says, "I don't think you really see how important you are. The eco-terrorist group kills eight people during a bombing at JFK airport.

We use cookies and other technologies to analyze site traffic, understand patterns of use, and improve your browsing experience. See our cookie policy. Skip to Content. See what's streaming, limit strong violence or language, and find picks your kids will love with Common Sense Media Plus.

Readers will learn something about codes, such as the Fibonacci code and Caeser shifts. They may be inspired to learn more or try some codes of their own. Farrah learns to be her true brainy self -- and show that self to John. Once she cracks a eco-terrorist group's code, she's committed to using her skills to fight them and thwart a major attack.

Farrah is a strong, smart girl, and she gets a lot of loving support from her parents and even her younger brother, who says, "I don't think you really see how important you are.

The eco-terrorist group kills eight people during a bombing at JFK airport. The suicide bomber is later revealed to be the mother of a child with a birth defect that was caused by a toxic environment. There's gunplay and threats of shooting, one character commits suicide, and Farrah works to stop a bombing. Some kissing between Farrah and John, and they spend the night together many times but just snuggle.

Also, much is made of the fact that while he's 21, she's still He tells her he wants to wait until she's 18 to take her to Hawaii. Farrah drinks beer sometimes, as does year-old John. She goes to a party where she throws up and gets a reputation for being a drinker, which she doesn't dispute; another teen there is passed out after being bullied into doing beer bongs.

Other adults drink wine, and a boy asks Farrah if she wants to get high. Parents need to know that readers will learn somethings about cracking codes in A Girl Named Digit -- and get a strong message about the importance of being their true selves. However, there's a surprising level of violence here: An eco-terrorist group kills eight people during a bombing at JFK airport and has another attack planned for Disney World. John's boss at the FBI had been kidnapped and tortured by this same group and is missing all the fingers of one hand.

There's also gunplay and threats of shooting, one character commits suicide, and students at Farrah's school think that she's been kidnapped and maybe raped. Beyond that, there's a romance between John, the year-old FBI agent, and year-old Farrah; they kiss and spend the night together, but nothing beyond snuggling takes place.

Set preferences and get age-appropriate recommendations with Common Sense Media Plus. Join now. Add your rating. Add your rating See all 1 kid review. Math genius Farrah has tried to act like a regular high school girl and distance herself from a painful middle school nickname: Digit. But when she cracks a code that an eco-terrorist group has been broadcasting on a popular teen TV show, she finds herself in serious danger -- and under the protection of a young, handsome FBI agent.

Between hiding out, jumping out of moving taxis, and staking out bad guys from a Central Park tree, Farrah and John find themselves in a deeper mystery -- and in love with each other. Tweens may find it a bit heavy on romance and a little light on actual code breaking, but readers looking for a beach book with a little bit of heart will find enough to satisfy them. Digit's transformation into a tough girl who's able to be her true self is realistic -- and worth cheering.

Families can talk about A Girl Named Digit 's message of being true to yourself. Do you think it's still true that girls hide their smarts from their friends? If so, why do you think that is, and what can we do to change it? Why do you think the author made a choice to make the violent group one that's fighting to protect the environment? Common Sense Media's unbiased ratings are created by expert reviewers and aren't influenced by the product's creators or by any of our funders, affiliates, or partners.

See how we rate. Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Thank you for your support.

Our ratings are based on child development best practices. We display the minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate. The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential. Learn how we rate. See our cookie policy Accept cookies. Parents' Ultimate Guide to Support our work! Find the best for your family See what's streaming, limit strong violence or language, and find picks your kids will love with Common Sense Media Plus. A Girl Named Digit. Fun story of math whiz girl who fights crime, finds romance.

Annabel Monaghan Adventure Rate book. Read or buy. Parents say No reviews yet Add your rating. Based on 1 review. Get it now Searching for streaming and purchasing options Common Sense is a nonprofit organization. Your purchase helps us remain independent and ad-free.

Get it now on Searching for streaming and purchasing options A lot or a little? The parents' guide to what's in this book. Educational Value. Positive Messages. Set limits for violence and more with Plus. What parents need to know Parents need to know that readers will learn somethings about cracking codes in A Girl Named Digit -- and get a strong message about the importance of being their true selves. Stay up to date on new reviews.

Get full reviews, ratings, and advice delivered weekly to your inbox. User Reviews Parents say Kids say. There aren't any reviews yet. Be the first to review this title. Teen, 13 years old Written by Emma Rogers August 10, Report this review. What's the story? Continue reading Show less. Is it any good? Talk to your kids about What do you think about a relationship between a year-old guy and a year-old girl? Great Girl Role Models. High School. Misfits and Underdogs. For kids who love stories about smart girls. Girl Heroes and Detectives.

Best Smart Movie Girls. Our editors recommend. Harriet the Spy. Great young sleuth helps kids be true to themselves. Fun debut of spy school series is OK for tweens. Fun, provoking start to dystopian series for teens. The Amanda Project: invisible i. About these links Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase. Read more. Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print. Personalize your media recommendations.

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