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The barong tagalog , more commonly known simply as barong and occasionally baro , is an embroidered long-sleeved formal shirt for men and a national dress of the Philippines. Barong tagalog combines elements from both the precolonial native Filipino and colonial Spanish clothing styles. It is a common formal or semi-formal attire in Filipino culture , and is worn untucked over an undershirt with belted trousers and dress shoes. Baro't saya is the feminine equivalent of barong tagalog, with the Maria Clara gown being the formal variant of the latter. The term "barong tagalog" is usually shortened in modern Filipino to "barong", though it is grammatically incorrect as barong is not a word that can stand alone. It contains the enclitic suffix -ng which indicates that it is modified by or modifies the next word. The root word of barong is the Tagalog word baro , meaning "outfit" or "clothing". Though "barong tagalog" literally translates to " Tagalog outfit", the "tagalog" in the name does not mean that it was a form of dress exclusive to the Tagalog people , as opposed to other Philippine ethnic groups. Barong tagalog and baro't saya were worn universally among Christianized lowlanders throughout the Philippines in the Spanish colonial period. Rather, the name was coined to distinguish the dress as native hence "tagalog", i.
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It is a national dress of the Philippines and combines elements from both the precolonial native Filipino and colonial Spanish clothing styles. The baro't saya has multiple variants, including the aristocratic traje de Mestiza also called the Maria Clara or Filipiniana ; the Visayan kimona with its short-sleeved or poncho -like embroidered blouse paired with a patadyong skirt; as well as the unified gown known as the terno , and its casual and cocktail dress version, the balintawak. Baro't saya is a contraction of "baro at saya", literally meaning "blouse and skirt", from Tagalog baro "shirt" or "clothing" and saya from Spanish "skirt". Women also usually wore bracelets over the baro. The Spanish clergy during the colonial period deemed the precolonial mode of dress as immodest for women and introduced the long skirt known by the Spanish name saya or falda to be worn under the tapis. In the Visayas, the patadyong was tolerated for longer, although it was eventually also replaced with the saya in the 19th century. By the late 18th century, the traditional everyday wear of women in the Philippines consisted of two basic pieces of clothing known as the pares "pair". This consisted of a saya reaching up to the ankles usually checkered and a collar-less baro or camisa usually plain. The name pares was more closely associated with the skirt, which unlike later saya were narrow and sheath-like, resembling precolonial tapis. They were secured at the waist by strings and had wide, flat pleats along the waistline held together by pins.
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The barong tagalog , more commonly known simply as barong and occasionally baro , is an embroidered long-sleeved formal shirt for men and a national dress of the Philippines. Barong tagalog combines elements from both the precolonial native Filipino and colonial Spanish clothing styles. It is a common formal or semi-formal attire in Filipino culture , and is worn untucked over an undershirt with belted trousers and dress shoes. Baro't saya is the feminine equivalent of barong tagalog, with the Maria Clara gown being the formal variant of the latter.

The term "barong tagalog" is usually shortened in modern Filipino to "barong", though it is grammatically incorrect as barong is not a word that can stand alone. It contains the enclitic suffix -ng which indicates that it is modified by or modifies the next word. The root word of barong is the Tagalog word baro , meaning "outfit" or "clothing". Though "barong tagalog" literally translates to " Tagalog outfit", the "tagalog" in the name does not mean that it was a form of dress exclusive to the Tagalog people , as opposed to other Philippine ethnic groups.

Barong tagalog and baro't saya were worn universally among Christianized lowlanders throughout the Philippines in the Spanish colonial period. Rather, the name was coined to distinguish the dress as native hence "tagalog", i. Barong tagalog is a formal shirt usually made of sheer lightweight but stiff material known as nipis.

The term camisa de chino is also used for collar-less and cuff-less shirts, named after its resemblance to shirts worn by Chinese laborers.

It is worn with belted trousers and dress shoes. The ensemble mixes elements of both native and Spanish traditions. Barong tagalog can vary considerably in terms of design and material used, but they share common characteristics of having long sleeves, embroidery, being buttoned halfway or straight down the chest , and the absence of pockets. They are also worn loosely and have slits on both sides. Historically, the material used for barong tagalog depended on the social class of the wearer and the formality of the occasion.

Barong tagalog made of fine, sheer material like nipis were worn largely by the upper classes or were used for festive occasions; while barong tagalog made of cheaper opaque materials like cotton or sinamay were used by lower classes or for daily wear. The quality of the material and the intricacy of the embroidery were often signs of the status and wealth of the wearer.

They feature various embroidery techniques, including calado and doble calado "pierced" and "double-pierced", types of openwork drawn thread embroidery , encajes de bolilio Venetian lace , and sombrado shadow embroidery. They can also have other kinds of ornamentation, like alforza pleats , suksuk weft floats , and even hand-painted designs.

Occasionally feminized versions are worn by women, either as an egalitarian or haute couture fashion statement; or as a form of power dressing when worn by female politicians such as Corazon Aquino during her presidency.

Among Tagalog men, they were commonly paired with a rectangle of richly-decorated cloth known as the salaual or salawal worn knee-length and drawn up in the middle; while in women they were paired with a wraparound skirt known as the tapis. The baro usually extend to just slightly below the waist. However in the Visayas , aside from similar baro which had shorter sleeves and salaual combinations, men also wore colorful robe-like and coat-like variants that could extend to well below the knees known as the marlota and baquero in Spanish, respectively.

These were sometimes belted at the waist. Among Tagalogs, red dyes and gold trimmings were indicative of being a member of nobility maginoo or the warrior caste maharlika. Early records of clothing in the Philippines during the Spanish colonial era from the 16th to the 18th centuries were limited, thus the exact evolution of the precolonial baro to the modern barong tagalog can not be established with precision.

Based on illustrations and written accounts, however, baro were still largely only worn by commoners during this period. The couturier Jose "Pitoy" Moreno has hypothesized that this transitional style of shirt was the camisa de chino of later centuries, which makes it a precursor to the barong tagalog. Depictions of members of the principalia upper classes including natives and mestizos in the 18th century showed that they invariably wore European-style clothing. The first baro precursor to gain favor among the local and mestizo elites was the barong mahaba literally "long baro" which became prominent starting from the s.

These were much longer than the modern barong tagalog, reaching down to slightly above the knees. They were also commonly striped with bold colors like blue, red, or green. However, they already displayed hallmarks of the modern barong tagalog, including being made of sheer nipis material, embroidery, long sleeves, and a loose silhouette with slits on both sides.

However, they lacked buttons. Early examples of barong mahaba usually had high-standing collars or even Elizabethan-style ruffs with narrow cravats. While barong mahaba were generally worn loose, they were sometimes fastened by silk strings through three openings around the waist, either over or under the shirt. By the s, barong mahaba largely fell out of fashion. In this period, it evolved into the modern "classic" barong tagalog, being much shorter with less ostentatious folded collars, while still retaining the sheer fabric and other baro characteristics.

They were also worn with smaller hats like bowler hats sombrero hongo or native buntal hats. They were initially paired with looser trousers, though they gradually assumed the dimensions of modern trousers by the end of the 19th century.

The colors of the barong tagalog also became more muted and monochromatic, in contrast to the colorful barong mahaba ensembles of earlier decades.

Barong tagalog ensembles from the midth century onwards were usually combinations of black and white, blue and white, or all-white. Baro worn by commoners also favored darker colors like brown or blue, usually paired with white silk pants.

This type of barong tagalog were common among government workers and businessmen, who usually wore them underneath jackets chaqueta. Sheer baro were also worn by natives and mestizos for fiestas , leisure activities like dancing, or for church. However, western-style suits became more popular among students of the burgeoning ilustrado educated class.

A notable variant of the barong tagalog during this period was the baro cerrado literally "closed baro". Its name is derived from its closed-neck collar. It was made from opaque material which can be white or darker colors and was paired with white pants. This style of baro remained popular up until the early s. A commonly repeated but unsubstantiated legend is that the Spanish colonizers forced the natives to wear their barong tagalog with the shirt tails hanging out to distinguish them from the ruling class; its translucent fabric allegedly showing that the wearer was not concealing a weapon underneath.

However, there are no records of any specific regulations that mandated the use of sheer material or banned the tucking in of men's shirts. Baro were always worn untucked, even in the precolonial period; and up until the 19th century, they were not made from translucent nipis fabric.

While the style and textiles worn by different classes did vary over the Spanish colonial period, this was due to fashion, wealth, and class distinction, rather than law. Most commoners throughout the colonial period wore baro made from cheaper and more durable opaque textiles, while expensive nipis fabrics were worn mostly by the upper classes. Indios and mestizos , regardless of class, wore barong tagalog and European-style clothing depending on what they can afford and which were fashionable at the time. The wearing of barong tagalog did have racial connotations however, since most people of unmixed European descent the insulares , criollos , and peninsulares retained their own dress styles and largely ignored native fashions.

The popularity of barong tagalog further waned during the American colonial period. It was replaced by suits known as Americana in the Philippines and tuxedos in most formal functions. In contrast, women persisted in wearing the native terno a modernized and unified version of the baro't saya , which was then associated with suffragists. Barro cerrada remained popular as informal leisure clothing, however. Quezon , which featured embroidery of the flags of the Commonwealth of the Philippines and the United States. However, other than this, Quezon mostly wore American-style formal wear and did not promote the barong tagalog.

After the independence of the Philippines in 4 July , Americana continued to be the dominant form of formal wear, and were worn by presidents Manuel Roxas and Elpidio Quirino. Unlike previous presidents, he deliberately wore a barong tagalog on his inauguration. The press played up the symbolism of Magsaysay in a barong tagalog and the outgoing Quirino in a western-style suit as symbolic of the "break" between the independent Philippines and its colonial past.

He also wore barong tagalog in most public and private state functions. Magsaysay's use of the barong tagalog as formal attire was unprecedented in modern times. His example was followed by other Philippine presidents , and by the time of Diosdado Macapagal 's term in the s, it had regained its status as formal wear.

Ferdinand Marcos , in particular, wore barong tagalog at almost every occasion. In , Marcos issued a decree for the barong tagalog, along with the baro't saya , to become the official national attires. June 5 to 11 was also declared as the "Barong Tagalog Week". Following Marcos' decree, barong tagalog became widely mandated as office wear for both employees of the government and private companies, as well as school uniforms. In the s to the s, companies like the Philippine Airlines , Ayala Corporation , and the Allied Bank were prescribing barong tagalog as their uniforms.

Various semi-formal and informal versions of the barong tagalog developed during this period, including the short-sleeved polo barong and the linen barong. While the barong tagalog was now regarded as formal wear, it did not gain popularity as a wedding attire for grooms in the early post-war Philippines. Most weddings featured a groom in a western suit and a bride in a terno. However, by the s, the situations had reversed.

Grooms now almost always barong tagalog, while women favored western-style bridal gowns. The finest barong tagalog are made from a variety of indigenous fabrics. They have a sheer appearance and the best are custom embroidered in traditional patterns.

The most common traditional materials used are listed below. Additionally, more informal barongs can also utilize common textiles like cotton , linen , polyester , or ramie. The term barong tagalog is almost exclusively used to refer to the formal version of the barong. Named variants of the barong tagalog include the following:.

The barong tagalog is a possible precursor to the guayabera , a shirt popular in Latin American communities since the late 19th century. A variant of the guayabera traditionally worn in Yucatan is still called " filipina.

Mestizos in the Philippines in barong tagalog and baro't saya by Jean Mallat de Bassilan c. Vilma Santos in a feminized version of the barong tagalog. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. A barong tagalog placed against the light, showing the translucency of the fabric. Retrieved 20 February Philippine Daily Inquirer. Clothing and the colonial culture of appearances in nineteenth century Spanish Philippines PhD.

In Roces, Mina; Edwards, Louise eds. The Politics of Dress in Asia and the Americas. Sussex Academic Press.

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